Manufacturing ideas to make art

An artist from the Dallas area, who now works as a professor, is the focus of a new exhibit at the Brazos Gallery, and students will have the chance to speak to him this week.

David Van Ness began his career as an artist. He grew up in the Dallas area. Now he works as a professor in Arizona and teaches basic art classes concerning concepts and new ideas.

Charles Coldeway, Richland’s Brazos Gallery art director, said Van Ness now focuses on generating ideas about new technology and ways it can be used to make art.

Van Ness will be questioned during a website interview from 1 to 2 p.m. Sept. 11 in the Brazos Gallery in Crockett Hall.

Students can speak with him directly about his work as an artist and his exhibit in the gallery.

“Caribou Conflict,” a stereolithograph made on a 3D printer by artist David Van Ness, is on display through Sept. 21 in the Brazos Gallery.

“Caribou Conflict,” a stereolithograph made on a 3D printer by artist David Van Ness, is on display through Sept. 21 in the Brazos Gallery.

“His main theme is all about ideas,” Coldeway said.  “He re-imagines what art can be - the idea of using manufacturing to make art.”

In one work titled “Wintering in the South” incorporates a photograph from a Houston flood. Van Ness added a bear on top of the car.  “He also uses animals as metaphors in his work,” Coldeway said.

Coldeway said he chose Van Ness for this exhibit because Van Ness is concerned about education and learning.

“I wanted people to see what happens when artists get involved with design, manufacturing and what artists can imagine using equipment,” Coldeway said. When artists involve themselves in process, or different types of manufacturing, he said, this process is built to make products in the world where artists can re-imagine it.

“Van Ness started working with prints in 2005. All of his work starts out as digital information,” Coldeway said.  “He’ll have an idea. Then he designs it on the computer.”

The exhibit runs through Sept. 21.