Women march in Metroplex for equality

Demonstrators march for women’s rights at the second annual Dallas Women’s March Saturday, Jan. 20 at Pike Park in downtown Dallas. 

Demonstrators march for women’s rights at the second annual Dallas Women’s March Saturday, Jan. 20 at Pike Park in downtown Dallas. 

Thousands of people took to the streets of downtown Dallas Jan. 20 to participate in the second annual Dallas Women’s March. Demonstrators called for women’s rights, equal justice and fair pay. Some of the participants attending the event traveled from outside of Texas due in part to the enormity of last year’s march.

The Dallas Women’s March began at St. Paul Methodist Church and ended with a rally at Pike Park. Women, men and children, many wearing pink, marched through the streets chanting, “women united will never be divided” and “this is what democracy looks like.”

A protest sign at Dallas women’s March on Jan. 20.

A protest sign at Dallas women’s March on Jan. 20.

The rally attracted local candidates running for office, media personalities and nonprofit groups promoting their causes. Rhetta Andrews Bowers with Planned Parenthood of Dallas is running for the Texas State House District 113. Bowers was one of the speakers.

“This is about our daughters and our sons and our children. Because as mothers we get up early, we start way before the other people start. We deserve equal pay for equal work because half the time we [are] doing more than the men do,” said Bowers.

She urged women to be their sister’s keeper. “We’ve got to hold each other up; don’t tear each other down. We have to stand side by side,” she said.

Rounding up her speech she urged the audience to turn out for the March primary elections. “Take your voice to the polls and vote.”

Others in attendance included Texas state Rep. Victoria Neave (HD 107), Dallas County Commissioner Elba Garcia and civil rights attorney Collin Allred who worked as a special assistant with the Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Obama Administration. Allred is running for Congress in House District 32.

The March for Life also took place in downtown Dallas in commemoration of the 45th anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion. The event began at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Guadalupe, just blocks away from the Dallas Women’s March, beginning and ending at the Earle Cabell Federal Courthouse.  The march attracted participants of all ages and backgrounds. No clashes were reported.

The women’s marches started last year in response to President Donald Trump’s inauguration. This year they spread across the continent and around the world. Similar marches took place in Canada, Great Britain, Italy and Japan. The theme remained the same with demonstrators voicing their disdain for the inequality that women face and against some of the policies that Trump has initiated.

In Texas, protests also took place in Fort Worth, Denton, Houston and Austin in record numbers. In Austin the demonstrators marched from City Hall to the state capitol with former Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis in attendance.

 

– Drew Castillo, Kammonke Obase-Wotta and The Associated Press